Computer-designed proteins recognize and bind small molecules

Computer-designed proteins recognize and bind small molecules

Posted by: on Sep 6, 2013 | No Comments

Computer-designed proteins that can recognize and interact with small biological molecules are now a reality. Scientists have succeeded in creating a protein molecule that can be programmed to unite with three different steroids.

‘Junk DNA’ Debunked

‘Junk DNA’ Debunked

Posted by: on Sep 6, 2012 | No Comments

The deepest look into the human genome so far shows it to be a richer, messier and more intriguing place than was believed just a decade ago.

Massive data trove of cancer genome data released by human genome sequencing project

Massive data trove of cancer genome data released by human genome sequencing project

Posted by: on Jun 22, 2012 | No Comments

In what has proved to be an invaluable database for scientists studying diseases of all kinds, the privately-funded St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital-Washington University Pediatric Cancer Genome Project has recently released a vast trove of human cancer genome data, which is available to researchers worldwide on request.

Inherited gene mutation appears to shorten telomeres and increase cancer risk

Inherited gene mutation appears to shorten telomeres and increase cancer risk

Posted by: on Feb 7, 2012 | No Comments

It has recently been found that people with an inherited mutation in the TP53 gene are much more likely to show signs of chromosome explosion, a condition called chromothripsis which is known to cause cancer.

The $1000 Genome

The $1000 Genome

Posted by: on Oct 27, 2011 | No Comments

I attended the Xconomy Forum last week on “Computing in the Age of the $1000 Genome”.

I found it fascinating, and while the focus was certainly much broader than telomere science and healthy aging, there were a number of great comments made by leading experts in the Human Genome that are very very relevant.  Here are some of my favorites:

“In your cells right now, an enzyme is making a copy of your DNA in less than two hours, right in the nucleus.”
Hugh Martin, Pacific Biosciences

“For all this amazing genomic info to have an impact, we really need to invite the person into personalized medicine.”
Ashley Dombkowski, 23andme